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5 Tips For Young Professionals Seeking an Internship

Posted in Main Blog
June 10, 2014 by Amanda N.
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Finding a position that’ll add to your resume, not just use up your summer.

The current job market is extremely competitive for recent college grads, and internships help them stand out with future employers. Finding an internship that fits your personality and teaches you transferrable skills is important to make sure you get the most out of your experience. A valuable internship should offer education, practical work experience, and the opportunity to grow as a young professional.

woman laying on grass using laptop

So how exactly do you find an internship where you aren’t just making coffee runs and filing papers?

Forbes provides valuable tips to consider when looking for the perfect internship that suits you both personally and professionally.

Things to Consider:

  • What are your values?
  • Exactly what is it that you want to gain from this experience?
  • What type of environment do you thrive in?
  • How far are you willing to travel?
  • Do you have the proper transportation?
  • Is the internship paid or unpaid?

Tip #1: Networking

Networking is an important part of finding an internship. Reach out to both your personal and professional contacts to see if you know anyone that works at the companies in which you are applying. Use sites like LinkedIn to see if you know anyone who knows anyone, it could help you get a foot in the door.

Tip #2: Develop a great cover letter, resume, and sample of your work

Develop a cover letter, resume, and any other application materials that the company requires. Your resume may be a single page with limited experience but include positions held in school, organizations you’ve worked with, and examples of projects you’ve been a part of. Peak their interest for best results.

Tip #3: Research the Company

Remember that it is important to research the company. Check them out on LinkedIn, Facebook, or just google their name. You can find all kinds of information to determine if they’re a company you want to work for, and what challenges they are facing. Come up with questions that directly connect to their reality to impress your interviewer with your level of interest.

Tip #4: Rock the Interview

Once you have secured an interview, professional dress is crucial until someone tells you otherwise. Arrive to the interview a few minutes early to make sure you have enough time to find where you are supposed to be. If the interview is relatively close it may be wise to drive there a few days prior to the interview to avoid getting lost the day of.

Always make sure to look the person interviewing you in the eye, be confident and have good posture. Make sure to ask them questions that show them that you are eager about the position. Ask the interviewer about next steps and the time frame in which they expect to make their decision. This information will tell you when a good time to follow-up about the position.

Tip #5: Follow-Up

An email is an acceptable way to follow-up with an employer after the time frame that they gave you. If they advised you to call this may also be acceptable. Handwritten notes are not as common with the increasing use of technology, but will certainly help you stand out against other candidates. Mashable provides expert tips on following up, including what NOT to do.

If you are offered the position make sure to respond to the offer in a timely manner. If you are not offered a job do not get discouraged. Every interview is a learning experience and better prepares you for the next one.

Good luck finding an internship, the experience will be more than worth it!

Sources:
Forbes.com
ResumeBuilder.org
Mashable.com
 

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Auto Loans for College Students

Posted in Main Blog
June 05, 2014 by BCCU
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Happy woman in car

 

 

In New Hampshire, there’s really no way around it; having a car is essential to everyday life. With the exception of urban areas such as Manchester or Nashua, there’s little-to-no public transportation available. 

 

 

 

If you’re a recent college graduate, the situation becomes even more imperative- gone are the days when everything you need is only a short walk across campus. You may be able to survive by hitching a ride with your family or friends, but that's a temporary solution. Once you land your first professional job, you'll need your own reliable source of transportation.

But how can a recent college student go about obtaining a car loan if you're already swamped with student loans and/or credit card debt?

You're not alone. Here are some facts to consider:

  • As of 2012, student loan debt surpassed credit card debt with a total of over $956 billion. (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)
  • Over 90% of college students have at least one credit card and graduating seniors have an average of $14K in credit card debt. (Forbes)
  • In 2011, students graduating from Granite State colleges and universities had the highest average student loan debt load in the nation at $32.4K compared to the national average of $26.6K. (Nashua Telegraph, the Project Student Debt)

These facts may seem daunting at first glance. But with the right financial institution, you can devise a plan for a successful future.

Some key advice for College graduates seeking a car loan:

1) Build Good Credit

If you can document your monthly income it’s time to start thinking about applying for a credit card under your name. Building good credit is not only a great habit, but also necessary to apply for loans, mortgages, auto insurance, rental applications, cell phone plans and even some jobs. Start by using your card for small, reoccurring expenses that you can pay off in a few months on a regular basis, such as groceries or your Netflix account. It's not a good idea to live off your credit cards, but in the beginning, to build a track record and not spend more than you should, using the card for regular expenses you already know you can afford helps to build a solid payment history. Think of building good credit as a journey; most financial institutions need to see six months or longer of good credit history before they decide to hand you a loan. It takes longer than a month or two, but if you stick to it, you'll get there. Lastly, the quality of your credit score will depend on your ability to make payments on time, so don’t be late!

Quick tip: Did you know that by law you are entitled to three copies of your credit report each year, for free? You can receive the reports all at once, or spread them throughout the year to track whether your credit is improving. Visit www.annualcreditreport.com for a free credit report. This is the official website to obtain your free reports.

2) Co-sign with a Parent/Guardian

If you’re still working on your credit history but need a vehicle now, another option would be to get a parent or guardian to co-sign the loan for your new or new-to-you car. Many financial institutions ask for a co-signer when a borrower has a limited credit history. The co-signer usually has established a good credit history and has a solid credit score. Many parents co-sign for their children’s cars in order to help them achieve financial independence quicker.If they're willing, this is a great way to get yourself started, but make certain you're the Primary Borrower so the payment history helps you build credit history. It’s also important to note that it's your responsibility to make payments on the car loan on time. If you fail to do so, responsibility is then be placed on the co-signer (parents or guardians). This could result in damaging your co-signer's good credit standing. They are taking a risk by signing with you, so talk with your parent or guardian about the possibility of co-signing a car loan before making your final decision and make sure you both understand the level of responsibility.

3) Seek Financial Advice

Regardless of how you obtain a car loan, it’s always important to seek professional advice. Important financial factors like your maximum debt-to-income ratio will determine the terms and amount of car loan available to you. At Bellwether Community Credit Union, our maximum debt to income ratio for auto loans is usually 40%. Meaning total debt (including housing, credit cards, other loans including student loan, and the new auto loan) can't exceed 40% of gross income (before taxes) on a monthly basis. Discussing your options with a professional will help point you in the right direction. Stop by one of our branches or call us at 1-866-996-9828 and we'll be happy to chat with you, no appointment needed. You can also submit one of our online applications available on our website.

To learn more about our auto/truck loans and apply online, visit our page.

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The Road to Getting a Motorcycle

Posted in Main Blog
May 30, 2014 by Jenn R.
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Warm weather is here and with it comes the excitement of open country roads and a new motorcycle. If you’ve been thinking about getting one,  there are few things you should know.

1.       You need a motorcycle license.

2.       You will need a motorcycle. (May seem obvious, but this is about the destination, not just the journey!)

3.       "How will you pay for that new ride?" (a very important question)

Getting the Paperwork Out of the Way

Obtaining a motorcycle license is pretty straight forward. You need to pass a vision test, prove sufficient fitness to drive a motorcycle, and you must be at least 16 years old.  Fitness is proven by either passing a Basic Rider Course or by taking a motorcycle skills test. In New Hampshire any applicant under 18 years old must take the Basic Rider Course.

Shopping for a Bike

Now the fun part: What kind of bike do you want? Options are varied:

guy on a motorcycle

Sport bikes (emphasizing speed, acceleration, braking and cornering on paved roads) - Kawasaki Ninja or a Suzuki GSC-R are good examples

Cruising bike (less demanding to ride because they're tuned for low-end torque, requiring less shifting. Also designed to allow the rider to sit in a more relaxed position) Honda Shadow,  Harley-Davidson Road King,  or Honda Gold Wing are great options.

It helps to consider how you will use the bike.  Are you looking to save on gas and drive it back and forth to work? Or are you and your friends up for leisurely drives on the weekends?

Financing Your Dream

Once you’ve decided what kind of motorcycle you want it's time to think about financing. Most people finance motorcycle purchases with a loan. Questions to ask yourself :

·        Will I finance all or only a portion of the money needed? 

·         What can I afford for a monthly payment?

·         How long do I want to be paying for this bike? (36 months?  48 months? Or something in between?)

A Bellwether bike loan provides multiple options and flexibility. We offer up to 100 percent financing. Apply online or stop by one of our branches to get started. At Bellwether we make applying for a motorcycle loan easy.

Sources:
State of NH Motorcycle information
Gas2 Blog

 

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Starting Your Emergency Fund

Posted in Main Blog
May 29, 2014 by Guest
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So, you’re brown-bagging your lunch, clipping coupons, and saving your pennies. Now what should you do with your savings? It’s time to do a little planning and settle on your savings goals – both short-term and long-term.

Save wrtten on a chalk board

Opening a savings account

Don’t simply decide you'll keep your extra cash in your checking account and vow not to touch it. It’s far too tempting to justify a splurge on a cute pair of shoes or a night out when the funds are so readily available. Set up a separate account for your emergency fund. This account should be separate from any other savings account, as well.

Setting savings goals

It’s important to start with a goal in mind, but don’t set your sights too high at first. Trying to save too much and cutting out all fun money can lead to frustration and send you off course. Choose a realistic initial goal, like $500 or $1,000. Employ some of the tips from my previous post to gather up initial savings and help you reach your goal as soon as possible. Once you reach your initial goal, set a new goal. Your second goal could be to save enough to cover one month of living expenses.

Experts generally agree you should have three to six months’ worth of expenses in your emergency account. Make this your ultimate goal, but don’t get bogged down with how far away those numbers seem. Remain steadfast with your commitment to save, and watch your account grow.

Make saving a habit in order to grow your fund, and increase the amount you can save each month as your situation changes. Consider setting aside a portion of each paycheck, and have it directly deposited into your emergency savings account. You may never miss the money you don’t see in your checking account, and this way you won’t be tempted to spend it. A little bit each week can add up quicker than you think.

When to use your savings

Emergency funds are just that: funds to use only in case of a crisis. Be clear on what constitutes an emergency for you. Large car repairs, appliance repair or replacement, and loss of employment all qualify. Nearing the end of a pay cycle and not having quite enough to purchase concert tickets, however, does not. Resist the temptation to dip in when it’s unnecessary, and honor the true purpose of your fund.

And as emergencies do pop up, remember to USE your savings. Many people get caught up in hoarding their savings and forget why they created an emergency fund to begin with. Don’t sink yourself into debt when you have the cash available; you’re creating this safety net to use it when you need it. You should choose to rebuild emergency savings instead of incurring debt and paying high interest. Saving now will allow you to handle life’s future twists and turns without disrupting your living habits.

Photo by Images Money via cc.

By Erin Pittman Copyright 2014 brass Media, Inc.

Ready to open an account? Get started here!
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BCCU Community Team Happenings

Posted in Main Blog
May 27, 2014 by BCCU
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Our own BCCU Community Teams participated in two important events this month.

Bedford Rotary Memorial Road Races

Photo of The BCCU Community Team

 

 

 

The BCCU Community Team at the 40th anniversary Bedford Rotary Memorial Road Races, May 17, 2014.

 

 

 

This year marked the 40th anniversary running of the Bedford Rotary Memorial Road Races. Races included the Bedford 12K Championship and the Uncle Sam's Rockin'-Walkin' 5K. The Rotary Club of Bedford NH has been serving the Bedford and West Manchester communities for 45 years—almost as long as the run has been in existence! Proceeds of the races go to local Bedford Rotary Club projects and charities.

The BCCU Community Team participated, with our own runners Don Blanchette and Katie Bisbo, and as a gold sponsor for the event.

Taking first place for the men in the 12K event was Amos Sang from Indian Orchard, MA, and for the women Christine Shaw of Manchester, NH. Our top BCCU Team runners were Don Blanchette and Katie Bisbo (pushing her daughter in a stroller!)

First place in the 5K event for the women was Julianne Quinn of Ithaca, NY, and only seconds ahead of her for the men was Sam Wood of Laconia, NH. Our top BCCU Team runners were Carly Hunt and Andrea Ireland. Nice job ladies!

For all the Bedford Rotary Memorial Road Races results, visit the results page at www.coolrunning.com.

 

Walk Against Hunger

Photo of the The BCCU Community Team

 

 

 

 

 

The BCCU Community Team was proud to help raise $128,000 in the New Horizons Walk Against Hunger on May 20, 2014.

 

 

 

 

On May 20th, members of our BCCU Community Team took part in the 22nd annual New Horizons Walk Against Hunger. This year the walk raised a record-setting $128,000 to ensure food and shelter for the hungry and homeless people of Greater Manchester.

44 teams came out to walk the four mile route on the 20th, but Manchester middle schools' students, staff and administration members were the largest support of this effort. They held their own walk events at each school and raised $30,000.

Charlie Sherman, Executive Director said, “It’s a feel good event, knowing that every dollar will help to provide children and their families. When children and their families come to New Horizons either for food distributed by our food pantry or for hot dinner meals served in our soup kitchen, it helps to keep them [children and their families] in their homes simply by saving enough money per month to pay rent.”

New Horizons for New Hampshire is a soup kitchen, food pantry and emergency shelter and support service. For more information about this important organization, you can call (603) 668-1877 or visit www.NewHorizonsforNH.org.

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